Geoengineering is no climate fix. But calling it a moral hazard could be counterproductive

December 09, 2019

Solar radiation management is perhaps the most controversial type of geoengineering. It would create a medium to block the sunlight from reaching the atmosphere, but it would also change our planet forever.

It would be best understood as a complement to ongoing decarbonization efforts—but only once the reliability, scalability, and acceptability issues have been resolved. Using the moral hazard framework is a distraction from the more fundamental ethical challenges facing these technologies.

Displaced migrants in higher education: Findings from a study on pathways and support

May 02, 2018

In January 2018 the University of Manchester, in collaboration with MCAA, launched a survey on the practices and attitudes in higher education institutions with regard to displaced students and academics. The aim of the survey was to identify the best practices to integrate displaced students and academics into higher education institutions. I was part of the research team looking into the findings of the survey. 

The untold migration story - How improved policies can benefit both receiving and sending societies

March 21, 2018

From the U.S. travel ban to the rise of anti-immigrant populists in Europe, politicians often decry migration in times of moral and economic crisis. Controversies can easily preclude a balanced understanding of what migration means – not only for immigrants and their new societies, but also for the places migrants leave behind.

The Future of European Research Funding

February 28, 2018

The Marie-Curie Alumni Association (MCAA) has provided recommendations for Horizon Europe in nine issues.  One of these issues is concerned with migration and refugees in higher education (Issue 8: Promote integration of displaced researchers in higher education institutions).

Can solar geoengineering be part of an effective global strategy to fight climate change?

September 08, 2016

“Geoengineering” refers to technologies that people might use to intentionally alter the planet’s climate system to address the threat of global warming. One of the most frequently discussed approaches is solar geoengineering – blocking some of the sun’s energy by, for example, injecting tiny particles into the atmosphere. But solar geoengineering is controversial. Some experts argue that it is a relatively cheap and quick fix for rising temperatures, the most pressing aspect of climate change. But critics point to potential negative side effects that could result from manipulating the climate in this way.

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